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JSS3 History Scheme of Work

Download the Junior Secondary School 3 (JSS3) Unified Scheme of Work for History to serve as a guide for educators

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About JSS3 History Scheme of Work

Studying History in Junior Secondary School 3 (JSS3) aims to provide students with a thorough understanding of past events and their influence on the present and future. This subject explores the diverse and intricate story of human civilization particularly in West Africa and Nigeria. It also examines the events of the Pre-colonial and Colonial era, independence, as well as the key personalities who were instrumental in the struggle for independence.

Knowledge of history is crucial for JSS3 students as it not only expands their understanding but also improves critical thinking and analytical abilities. Additionally, excelling in history is essential for success in the Basic Education Certificate Examination (BECE), a significant test that assesses students’ readiness for senior secondary education. 

Through studying history, students gain a greater appreciation for their heritage, learn important lessons from previous societies, and become better prepared to engage as informed citizens in a global context.

Assessment Guide

The crowning event for Jss3  and the Junior Secondary school as a whole is the Basic Education Certificate Examination (BECE) which is taken mid-third term. The assessment methods for History include written examinations, which may consist of multiple-choice questions, short-answer questions, and essay-type questions. These exams are conducted in a controlled environment to ensure fairness and integrity.

Furthermore, continuous assessment, which involves periodic tests, assignments, and projects conducted throughout the academic session, also contributes to the overall BECE assessment. This allows for an all-around evaluation of students’ performance and progress over time.

JSS3 First Term Scheme of Work for History

 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PROPRIETORS OF PRIVATE SCHOOLS (NAPPS) SCHEMES OF WORK FOR JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
 History Scheme of Work for Junior Secondary School 3(JSS3)
 ClassJ.S.S 3
 SubjectHistory
 TermFirst Term
WeekTopicBreakdown
1ORIGIN OF THE TRANS – SAHARAN TRADE AND ITS  NATUREArab slave trade since medieval time. The Arab conquest of North Africa and spread of Islam to Sudan region and the Sahelian (Sahel Sahara) kingdoms. E.g. The conquest of the Maghreb Berbers. The Trade across the Sahara to Ancient Ghana and the Eventual Conquest of the Ghana conquest of the Ghana Empire by the Almoravid movement led by Abdullahi Ibin Yacin from North Africa
2ORGANIZATION AND STRATEGIES EMPLOYED FOR THE PROGRESS OF THE TRANS SAHARAN TRADECommodities Traded, Sources and Trade Routes: A. Commodities: slaves from black African nations (2) Horses (3) Gold (4) Ostrich Feathers (5) Salt (6) Spices (7) leather, textile, etc.
B. Trade Routes 3 Major Routes Namely: 1) The Borno Tripolis route (Borno –North Africa)
2) Kanem-Borno-sudan route
3) Kano – Fezzan route to morocco
C. Sources of commodities traded.
3EFFECTS OF THE TRANS-SAHARAN TRADE ON (WEST AFRICA) NIGERIAThe general impact of the Trans-Saharan. Trade on Africa, North Africa, and West Africa, present day Nigeria etc.
Advantages of the Trans-Saharan Trade.
Disadvantages of the Trans-Saharan trade
4EFFECTS OF THE TRANS-SAHARAN TRADE ON WEST AFRICA AND NIGERIA 
5THE SPREAD OF ISLAM IN WEST AFRICA AND NIGERIA:The North African Arabs having accepted Islam brought same through trading interactions to West Africa. To this, many Fulani and Hausa accepted the religion through Trade contact from North Africa to West Africa e.g. Kano, Katsina, Zaria, Daura land in the 12
and 13th centuries.
In West Africa: The acceptance of Islam by leaders, e.g. Gao – was the first king to accept Islam by (1009) Barmandana was the first Malian king to accept Islam
UmmeJilmi (1086) – was the first Kanem Borno king to accept Islam.
The Almoravid Invasion of Ghana Empire was another attempt at spreading Islam in West Africa.
6MAIN REASONS FOR FAST SPREAD OF ISLAM IN WEST AFRICA, NIGERIA– Reasons for the fast spread of Islam.
i) The nature of Islam
ii) Trade
iii) Activities of rulers
iv) Activities of Muslim clerics
v) Inter marriages with natives
vi) Muslim Scholars e.g. Al’Maghili
vii) The administrative system of sokoto Caliphate was presented by the Bristish because it was found to be suitable for the success of Indirect Rule.
7EARLY EUROPEAN CONTACT WITH AFRICAGeneral Nature and purpose
Nature of the Early European contact with Africa: how it all began:
Why Europeans decided to explore Africa from Portugal, German etc
8EARLY EUROPEAN CONTACT WITH WEST AFRICA; EARLY EUROPEAN CONTACT WITH NIGERIA.The Great Benin Empire contact with Portuguese explorers.
― Early European Merchants: East Taubman Goldie, John Hot.
― Early European missionaries: e.g. Mary Slessor, Birch Freeman, Samuel Bill, Henry Townsend etc.
The historic trade relationship that developed between the ancient Benin Empire in 1485 and the Portuguese explorers who were the first Europeans to reach Benin.
9EARLY EUROPEAN CONTACT WITH NIGERIA: 1) THE TRANS-ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE (THE ILLEGITIMATE TRADE)― Nature and organization of the TransAtlantic slave trade
― European that came to Nigeria as explorers
― The route of the trade through the Atlantic Ocean from Lagos- Calabar.
― Impact of the Atlantic slave trade.
― Abolition of the Atlantic slave trade.
 THE TRANS-ATLANTIC TRADE: THE LEGITIMATE TRADEThe Trade in Palm Oil received a boom.
10EARLY EUROPEAN CONTACT WITH NIGERIA: ADVENT OF CHRISTIANITY IN NIGERIA― Arrival of the first Christian monks of the Augustinian and Capuchin order from Portugal to Benin Empire in 15 century.
― The first mission of the Church of England – led by H. Townsend– arrival Badagry in 1842.
― List of the rest of the missionaries from different European centuries, the area they settled in Nigeria, the church they represented etc. (E.g. Mary Slessor, Ajayi Crowther, Birch Freeman, Samuel Bill, etc.
 IMPACTS OF THE CHRISTIAN MISSIONARIES IN NIGERIA― Impact of the Christian missionaries
― Spreading of the Gospel of Jesus Christ
― Emergence of print media in Nigeria.
― Produced the early middle class Nigerian elites.
― Introduced English language etc.
11REVISION 
12EXAMINATION 

JSS3 Second Term Scheme of Work for History

 TermSecond Term
WeekTopicBreakdown
1BRITISH COLONIZATION OF NIGERIA TERRITORIES― The fall of the Songhai Empire to which some parts of today’s Nigeria belonged e.g. Lagos
― General points on the British Colonization of the Nigeria Territories
2THE BRITISH ECONOMIC PURSUIT IN AFRICA― The British Economic pursuit in Africa that brought them to the coasts of Nigeria.
― Names of the early personalities involved in trades, battles, (e.g. in the ancient slave trade etc.)
― How they progressed etc.
― When the actual colonization started and how long it lasted in Nigeria.
3BRITISH CONQUEST OF NIGERIA.British Contact with Nigeria
― as explorers
― as Traders and Merchants
― How the British conquered Nigerian Territories
― The British tactics of signing of treaties.
― Waging of wars
― Signing of Treaties
― Role of Traditional local authorities for and against the British.
4THE PROTECTORATES OF BRITAIN IN NIGERIA: LAGOSLagos Colony
5NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN PROTECTORATES-Northern Nigeria Protectorate
-Southern Nigeria Protectorate
-Northern Region vs. Southern Region etc
6BRITISH COLONIZATION OF NIGERIA― How the regions were governed?
― British governors that headed each region and the period.
― Economy politics, geography
― Population, Religion etc.
― How the southern protectorate was administered by the British colonial masters?
7THE ERA OF NEW IMPERIALISM (BRITISH IMPERIALISM IN NIGERIA).The British Economic drive in Nigeria: Various kinds of taxes: poll tax trade on cash crops, etc.
8BRITISH SYSTEM OF COLONIAL GOVERNANCE E.G. -DIRECT RULE –INDIRECT RULE.― The introduction of Direct rule
― The Indirect rule
― Reactions to taxation by the then citizens of different regions of Nigeria. Activities of some personalities e.g. Lord Lugardetc. (e.g. The Aba riots of 1929 by women)
9MERITS AND THE DEMERITS OF THE BRITISH SYSTEM OF COLONIZATION: THE ASSOCIATION SYSTEMAssociation: A system adopted by the British Colonial Masters as main tool for colonization of Nigeria.
― The merits of direct rule by the British in the Southern areas of Nigeria.
― The demerits of direct rule
― The introduction of indirect rule through the local emirs in the Northern Region of Nigeria by the British: The Advantages and the disadvantages of the indirect rule and its effects to this present day.
― Outfall of the indirect rules: How the citizens reacted to this new imperialism’s method of revenue drive for instance: ―In the Northern Nigeria
― In the Western Nigeria
― In the Eastern Nigeria
E.g. The women led movements against head tax, and in the West and in East. Resistance of produce tax in the North etc.
10THE EVOLUTION OF THE NIGERIAN STATE: THE HISTORY OF
NIGERIA TO THE ADVENT OF THE BRITISH
Pre historic settlers from different race background and some aborigines lived in this area since 1100BC.
― The Berlin Treaty
― Outfall of the Abolition of slave trade.
11REVISION 
12EXAMINATION 

 

JSS3 Third Term Scheme of Work for History

 TermThird Term
WeekTopicBreakdown
1THE AMALGAMATION OF NIGERIA– What is Amalgamation
– What happens when an amalgamation takes place among people/nations / tribes?
– Reasons for the Amalgamation of Nigerian Territories by the colonial masters.
2THE AMALGAMATION PROCESSProcess of the Amalgamation of Nigerian Territories: The joining of Northern Nigeria to Southern Nigeria.
– Reasons for the amalgamation
– Who approved it and date of the amalgamation
3KEY PERSONALITIES AND THEIR ROLES IN THE AMALGAMATION OF NIGERIAN TERRITORIES.– The British side. Lord Lugard, Taubman Goldie, The British Crown European missionaries etc. – The Nigerian side: The upcoming Nigerian freedom activists like Nnamdi Azikiwe etc. Local authorities like the Caliphate of Sokoto
and the Northern Emirs. Traditional rulers and elders e.g. the Obas of the West, the Ezes of the Eastern Nigeria, leaders in the middle belt like the Tor Tiv, etc.
― early elites, newspapers etc.
4THE INDEPENDENCE MOVEMENTWhat is Independence?
What is Nationalism?
What is Federalism?
Who is an activist?
What is a Republic?
5FACTORS THAT LED TO THE INDEPENDENCE MOVEMENT― The high handedness of the colonial administration.
― The shortcomings of the direct and indirect colonial rules.
― Tax collection methods and the taxing of women.
― The upspring of Early Elites from the mission schools of Christian missionaries.
The early Nigerian Newspapers as a voice channel for the then Nigerian Young Elites.
6THE NATURE OF NIGERIAN NATIONALISM: THE STRUGGLE FOR INDEPENDENCE.― Contextual definition of Nationalism.
― The beginning of the agitation
― Mediums used for the struggle – e.g. Print media, Radio, organized public demonstrations against the British administration especially by women, some of who lost their lives. e.g. The Aba riots of 1929 key personalities.
7PEOPLE INVOLVED IN THE STRUGGLE FOR NIGERIAN INDEPENDENCENames of key personalities like:
Nnamdi Azikiwe, Herbert Macaulay, Anthony Enahoro, Okpara, Chief Obafemi Awolowo, Ahmadu Bello, Amino Kano, etc.

Women leaders like: Adanma Okpara, Mrs. Ransom Kuti, Helen Ekpo, etc.
8THE ATTAINMENT OF INDEPENDENCE― Reflection on what independence means.
― The role of the British administration in the attainment of Nigerian Independence.
― The role of the British crown headed by Queen Elizabeth the second.
― The various activities of the key personalities involved.
9THE BERLIN TREATY (CONTINUATION OFTHE EVOLUTION OF THE NIGERIAN STATE)― Major features of the Berlin Treaty.
― What is a Treaty
― Implications of the Berlin Treaty for the Nigerian citizens.
10THE ROLE OF THE ROYAL NIGER COMPANY IN THE EVOLUTION OF THE NIGERIAN STATE.– The Royal Niger Company: Who are they?
What was their business in Nigerian territories? What role they played in the colonial governance of the Nigerian territories. Names of British key personalities that were part of the Royal Niger Company. Their Relationship with the crown of Britain. etc.
 COLONIAL CONQUEST AND
ADMINISTRATION:
Colonial Conquest and administration of the various territories of the Nigerian State. Lagos under the BeninEmpire was conquered and annexed. The story of king Jaja of Opobo in the Eastern Region – (Rivers – Bayelsa of today). Various confrontations with other local authorities in the East, West, South, Middle belt, North parts of the Nigerian territory etc. Why the British went to battle against the native authorities. The outcome of such wars and the impact on the people’s way of life –politically, economically, socially,religion etc. The activities of local chief etc. that enabled the conquest.
11REVISION 
12EXAMINATION 

Recommended History Textbooks for Junior Secondary School 3

The recommended textbooks for History in J.S.S.3 include:

  • Pacific History /workbook for upper UBE class by Stanley Nduagu (Ph.D), Pst Chigozie Okwuosa – Pacific Publishers 
  • Basic Facts in History for Junior Secondary Schools (Upper Basic Education) by B.E Ubaka et al Elites Publishers 
  • Spectrum Basic History by M.D Suleman et al  – Spectrum Books Ltd 
  • History for Junior Secondary Schools for J.S.S.3 by AI Yandaki et al  – Learn Africa 
  • Model Basic History for Junior Sec Sch by Obi, franca Ego (Ph.D) – Chase Publication Ltd  
  • Model Step-by-Step History by Okoachala R.C  – Mid-field Publishers Ltd J.S.S.3

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